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Pier 94

Nature—with the help of hardworking Golden Gate Audubon volunteers—is reclaiming a hidden wetland consisting of nearly five acres of isolated industrial land near Pier 94 on San Francisco’s southern waterfront. Located in the shadow of container ships and heavy equipment, the restored salt marsh and adjacent upland will provide valuable habitat for birds, butterflies, and small mammals. It will also provide residents of the neighboring Bayview-Hunters Point community access to a unique urban wildlife experience.

Golden Gate Audubon’s cleanup efforts began on Earth Day 2002. Since then, hundreds of volunteers have hauled away over a half-ton of scrap metal, several truckloads of star thistle, and hundreds of old tires. With the help of our members and volunteers, we are gradually changing the landscape and creating valuable habitat for birds, fish, tidal marsh plants, and other wildlife. Native salt marsh has already formed along this small part of the San Francisco Bay shoreline and is beginning to attract sandpipers, herons, terns, Snowy Egrets, Willets, Killdeer, and American Avocets.

Conservation Issues

The tidal wetlands at Pier 94 are among the few remaining such wetlands around the bay. They have the potential to provide much-needed habitat to shorebirds—making their restoration an important priority for Golden Gate Audubon. Invasion of exotic eastern cordgrass (Spartina alternaflora), an invasive species that is destroying wetlands throughout the bay, threatens native plants and wildlife at the site.

Progress

Golden Gate Audubon monitored the plants at Pier 94 with the Port of San Francisco.  See the Port’s report  on our monitoring efforts 2008 Pier 94 Plant Monitoring Report

Our Goals

Golden Gate Audubon and the Port of San Francisco are working together to improve wildlife habitat at Pier 94 by restoring the wetland and improving water circulation and other wetland functions. Our ongoing efforts include:

  • Expand the wetland, improve tidal circulation, and create an upland transition zone of native plants
  • Create a sandy marsh that will support several plant species no longer found in San Francisco
  • Collaborate with the Port, the Bay Area Early Detection Network and other agencies to clear invasive plants from the site
  • Build community and city-wide awareness of the wetland and wildlife values at Pier 94
  • Offer educational and recreational opportunities to the Bayview-Hunters Point community

What You Can Do

  • Contact our San Francisco Conservation Committee to find out how you can help us reach out to the surrounding community by providing educational resources and field trips.
  • Join our volunteeer work parties in removing invasive plants, trash and planting hundreds of native plants. Contact volunteer@goldengateaudubon.org  to learn about the next event (normally the first Saturday of each month 9:00 am-12 noon) at this site.